Hit By Ransomware: Should I Pay? A Guide for Business

It’s the dirty little secret of too many businesses to count: they got hit by ransomware and quietly paid up (the amoral/pragmatic, depending on your viewpoint) or stripped and rebuilt thousands of desktops and servers (the pugnacious/distrusting). For many more, it’s not a dirty little secret: it’s a highly public case of egg on your face (particularly for the security companies hit in 2019), tumbling share price and customer fear (was our data stolen/have our systems also been infected as a result?) Yet two long years after shipping giant Maersk was forced to rebuild a network of 4,000 servers and 45,000 PCs after a colossally destructive NotPetya attack, ransomware incidents remain widespread; powered by increasingly sophisticated malware. (Security firm Emsisoft highlights 103 federal, state and municipal governments and agencies hit in the US this year, among 1,000 public sector incidents: just this morning ZDNet reports that a coast guard facility was hit by the Ryuk ransomware.) For those who haven’t been hit, it can be hard recognise quite how crippling and debilitating such an attack can be. Computer Business Review spoke to over 20 security experts for guidance on how...

Ethan’s Law: Parents push for safe gun storage law after son’s death

Kristin and Mike Song are still in disbelief that their 15-year-old son, Ethan, is gone. He accidentally shot himself last year when he was at a friend’s house, playing with guns.  “They were stored in a cardboard box, along with the ammo. There was a gun lock in there but the keys were in there,” Mike Song said. The Songs had no idea the home had firearms and they said careless gun storage cost their son his life. “Ethan pulled the trigger and he was shot in the head, so he really had no chance of survival,” Kristin Song said. A recent study by Harvard researchers estimated up to 32% of youth firearm deaths by unintentional injury and suicide could be prevented if guns were properly locked and stored and ammunition is kept separately. Only three states and Washington, D.C. make unsafe storage, regardless of whether a child ever touches the gun, a crime. There is no federal law for safe gun storage. But now, the Song family is fighting for one in their son’s name. Ethan’s Law was introduced to Congress on Tuesday. It states unsafe storage of a firearm resulting in injury or death of a minor is a crime and punishable by up to five years ...